Insomnia Part 1: Maybe you should just count sheep.

By John Fowler from Placitas, NM, USA
By John Fowler from Placitas, NM, USA

I think I may hold the world record for the fastest time in falling asleep.  Usually I’m out about a nanosecond after my head hits the pillow.  And that’s just at night.  I’m pretty good at falling asleep just about anywhere during the day as well.  I think it’s a relic from my medical training days where the ability to sleep anywhere at anytime comes in really handy.

So falling asleep?  No problem for me.

But every now and then, somewhere around 2 or 3:00 in the middle of the night, I wake up.  And when this happens, I almost immediately start thinking about a zillion different thoughts.  Last week when I inexplicably woke up at 3:00 a.m., I started thinking about a creepy discovery that my wife and I had made earlier in the day.  It involved rodents, birdseed, and a crack in our house’s foundation.  So my mind was racing, lying in bed in the middle of the night, and nothing I could do helped me get back to sleep.

I seriously considered counting sheep until I realized that the specifics of how one actually counts sheep while lying in bed are not apparent to me.  Do you envision sheep leaping over a fence like in a cartoon?  Or do the sheep pass in front of you in a single file line?  Perhaps there is an audio component and you count the “baa” sounds.

Does anybody really know how to count sheep to help insomnia?  I’m desperate here.  So let’s turn elsewhere for some tips on sleep.

In this post you will find:

  • Two short videos about insomnia.
  • Links to insomnia resources.
  • Some background about the types of insomnia.
  • Practical tips to help you sleep.

Continue reading “Insomnia Part 1: Maybe you should just count sheep.”

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Burns 1-2-3

fire_from_brazierHey hey we are going to talk about burn injuries to your skin in this post.  It’s a follow-up to the radio broadcast of last week where I talked with a burn surgeon.  We learned some really important information about what to do when you or a loved one gets burned and we picked up cool lesser known (at least to me) factoids about burns and your skin.

 

Factoid:  Your skin is the largest organ in your body.  OK, maybe you knew that one already.

Read on to learn more about:

  • Most common causes of burn injuries in children and adults, including a short video of some knuckleheaded guys.
  • The classification of burns – that 1st, 2nd, 3rd degree business.
  • First aid for burns.  What to do if you get burned.  And what not to do.
  • An insider look at a modern Burn Unit, complete with a slick video.

Continue reading “Burns 1-2-3”

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Join our #yesMAMM Twitter Chat on October 27

breastcancerawareness

Save the date: October 27, Noon-1:00

As I have mentioned both on the air and in previous blog posts right, October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

So far this month we have talked about breast cancer detection on the Healthy Matters radio broadcast (which you can check out here via podcast) and I did a longer post about mammography right here on the blog.

Now we’re planning a cool and interactive way to keep the conversation going: a Twitter chat!  What’s that, you say?  Good question!

Dr. Tony Severt
Dr. Tony Severt

The Twitter chat will feature Dr. Tony Severt (the radiologist who was on the radio broadcast) answering your questions via Twitter, LIVE on October 27 from Noon – 1:00 p.m.  To participate, simply share your breast cancer or mammography story, ask a question, or raise a comment using the hashtag #yesMAMM and using my Twitter handle: @drdavidhilden.  Then sit back and watch the conversation, hear Dr. Severt’s answers, and learn a bit more about breast cancer detection.

Pass the word on to your friends:  October 27, Noon – 1:00 p.m.

@DrDavidHilden

#yesMAMM

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Do you need a mammogram?

breastcancerawarenessOctober is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

I wrote this post about 4 or 5 times.  The first draft found me in the weeds of details and statistics.  In the second draft I sounded too preachy.  My third attempt covered every aspect of breast cancer from risk factors to diagnosis to treatment and was waaaaaaay too long.   I just couldn’t seem to get it right.

Then I realized that breast cancer is a multi-headed beast.  It has technical clinical aspects.  It has emotional overtones.  It has a definite gender angle that I, as a man, really cannot fathom.  It has controversy.  It is scary.

It is just too much to cover in one blog post, ergo, my troubles in writing about it.  So I’ve decided to talk about a single aspect of breast cancer – that being the role of mammography in screening.

I know people with breast cancer.  I bet you do as well.

Do you know anyone who has been diagnosed with breast cancer?  I’m guessing you do.  Perhaps someone you love died of breast cancer.  Perhaps you know someone living with breast cancer.  Perhaps you or someone in your life was recently diagnosed.  Perhaps you are a survivor yourself.

I know so many people in my life (not just my doctor life, I mean my real life) who have or have had or did have breast cancer.  It is really sobering.  Really close friends.  Several women from my church congregation.  Relatives.  My own mother-in-law.  Wonderful strong women all of them.

The point is that breast cancer is a relatively common disease that affects nearly 1 in 8 women in their lifetime.  The other point is that breast cancer takes a variety of forms and affects women (and men) with many different faces from every community.  And another point is that breast cancer is treatable.

This Sunday on Healthy Matters (my weekly health and wellness radio show) we talked about breast cancer screening with the major focus on mammography as the single most effective screening method available.  In this post I will cover:

  • Expert advice from last Sunday’s radio broadcast featuring radiologist and mammography expert Dr. Tony Severt.
  • Some solid information about breast cancer screening – the guidelines for mammography, including the newest 2016 guidelines
  • A look at the controversy around mammography guidelines.

Thanks for joining me.  Let’s learn something together . . .

Continue reading “Do you need a mammogram?”

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