Quick tips: Shingles and pnuemonia shots, blocked coronaries, antibiotics for dental work, HIV test

Hennepin Healthcare’s Clinic and Specialty Center

Hey, friends!  Here’s another “Quick tips” post in which I answer a few of the questions posed by listeners to a recent Healthy Matters radio broadcast.  As is often the case, I can’t get to all the questions, but this week’s grab bag of topics is a good one.

Read on.  Or if you are aurally inclined, you can listen to the podcast recording at your leisure by clicking the banner below.  The questions here are taken directly from listeners from Healthy Matters show #480, March 25, 2018.

I’m going to scatter pictures of our newly-opened Clinic and Specialty Center, which is a state-of-the-art medical facility in downtown Minneapolis.  Cool to see a new medical facility that still has that “new clinic” smell – ha!

Continue reading “Quick tips: Shingles and pnuemonia shots, blocked coronaries, antibiotics for dental work, HIV test”

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The connection between weight and heart disease

We all know that being overweight is probably not good for our health.  It seems to make intuitive sense and there is ample scientific data that says losing weight is good for you in the long run.  But there are many uncertainties.  One of the unanswered questions is how best to measure body fat and how best to correlate being overweight with long-term disease.

This past week there was a big study published out of Europe that tried to address these issues.  In this post I’m going to break it down for you and see if there is anything we can learn from this study.  As always,  it is important to note that this is just one observational study, which means that it simply looks at a large population of people and attempts to observe a specific medical outcome (in this case, heart disease) with a specific condition (in this case being overweight).  It can’t prove cause and effect!

Consider this post a “mini-Medical School” in which I’ll walk you through a medical research study.  It may get a bit nerdy.  Here we go.

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Opioids for back, knee, and hip pain? A chat with Dr. Erin Krebs

You have undoubtedly heard about the opioid crisis. It is a near daily part of my life since treating pain is a hefty part of what most doctors do. In addition, I am fortunate to work in an academic health setting so I am surrounded by researchers and teachers. Just this week, one of my friends and colleagues, Dr. Charlie Reznikoff was in Washington DC where he testified about opioids to members of Congress. So you might say I’m surrounded by smart people on this issue.

In this post, I want to draw your attention to some new information about treating arthritis pain.  A new study was recently published in JAMA (one of the most respected journals in existence) which concluded that for chronic back pain and arthritis pain of the hips and knees, opioids are no better than other remedies.

Let me say that startling conclusion again:  opioids are no better than non-opioid treatments at relieving low back, knee, and hip pain.  There is NO advantage, and plenty of risk, in using opioids to treat these chronic pain conditions.

This is big news.  For me, it is just a little bigger because the lead author of the study is a Minneapolis physician from my medical school class, Dr. Erin Krebs. Dr. Krebs is a leading researcher in this area and I may add, a terrific doctor and person. To her, I say, well done! To learn more about Dr. Krebs, check out her site from the VA here.  You can also learn more about her from the University of Minnesota Medical School.

I reached out to Dr. Krebs and she graciously responded to some of my questions about her research.  I offer her insights to you below.  This is a rare chance to hear from a physician-scientist, uncluttered from what you may find elsewhere on the Internet.  Often people ask me what where to get reliable information on health issues.  On this issue, this is as reliable as it gets.  I’ll include a couple links as well, including one to an audio interview with Dr. Krebs.  Read on.
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Quick tips: tremors, blood pressure, constipation

Hey, everybody.

Some of my most popular posts are these Quick Tips in which I do relatively brief answers to health topics raised by listeners to the Healthy Matters radio broadcasts.

This time, I’ll cover these three topics from actual listener questions.

Continue reading “Quick tips: tremors, blood pressure, constipation”

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