Alicia’s incredible story. Read this post, save a life.

Alicia Bravo, BAN RN CEN TCRN CPEN
Brad Bart, MD

Be brave.  That is Alicia’s message.

This is undoubtedly the most powerful story we’ve yet told in 10 years of Healthy Matters broadcasts.

If you missed last week’s show, you missed a doozy of a personal story.  Alicia Bravo is a nurse at Hennepin’s Emergency Department and just one year ago this healthy triathlete experienced a sudden cardiac arrest while swimming.  Her dad and husband saved her life with CPR and now she is spreading the word about it.  You’re going to want to listen to her tell the story on the podcast by clicking Listen to Podcasts at the right of this page.

To give us additional expertise, we were joined in the studio by Dr. Brad Bart, Director of Cardiology at Hennepin Healthcare.    As a follow-up to the show, I asked each of them to respond to some written questions.   What follows is from Alicia and Dr. Bart.  There are powerful and wise words in this post, some links to helpful sites, a way you can donate to CPR education, and even an event that involves drinking beer.

I encourage you to read it through.  You may save a life someday.

Please share this post on Facebook, Instagram, and with your friends by clicking the icons above.  This is a message we need to get out!  

Continue reading “Alicia’s incredible story. Read this post, save a life.”

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Quick tips: shingles, dementia & depression, high blood pressure medications

Since you asked . . . here’s another “Quick tips” post from last week’s Healthy Matters broadcast.    I have included links to point you toward reliable information if you want to learn more.  The Internet is full of not-so-reliable information so I try to include sources that I think you can trust.  That’s assuming you trust me.  As my texting daughter would say “hahahaha”!

 

To listen to the podcast of this recent “Open Lines” show, click this banner and look for April 29, 2018 show (Healthy Matters show #485)

On to the questions from listeners . . .

Continue reading “Quick tips: shingles, dementia & depression, high blood pressure medications”

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“Decade with Dave” and Here 4 Health series

Hi, friends!  See that sign in the picture?  Those signs are all over the campus at Hennepin Healthcare.  Let’s just say my co-workers have shown no mercy in teasing me about them.

But hey – we have something to celebrate!  I’m super pumped to be launching “Decade with Dave”  – our celebration of 10 years of our Healthy Matters broadcast!

We’re starting with a live broadcast of Healthy Matters from the atrium at Hennepin Healthcare’s Clinic and Specialty Center complete with a LIVE audience.  That’s where you come in.  I’m inviting you –  my Healthy Matters listening friends – to be that live audience on Sunday, June 10.   Denny Long will be there, I’ll be there, and I hope YOU will be there.

Here’s what we’re planning for the live broadcast of Decade with Dave . . .

Diabetes and the Sweet Life.  I’ve invited an old friend from my medical training, Dr. Laura LaFave, to introduce her to Healthy Matters listeners.  Dr. LaFave recently rejoined the Hennepin Healthcare faculty in Endocrinology – in fact I don’t even have a link to her picture yet!  She’s a friend, a smart doctor, and a genuinely good person.  She’s been practicing for over a decade but only been back to Hennepin for a few months, so to welcome her back to our family I’m putting her in front of a live audience.  She’s a good friend, eh?  We’ll talk about diabetes and other hormone-y topics.

Arthritis Treatment Options:  Moving from Pain to Gain. Dr. Rawad Nasr is Hennepin’s Director of Rheumatology and another colleague with whom I go way back.  We dragged him back from his practice in Bemidji to join our Hennepin faculty.  His recent show about arthritis was a huge hit with listeners so he’s coming back to chat with me about arthritis and joint questions.  You’ll love this guy.

 

Sleep Health:  What Keeps You Up at Night. Another really popular topic – in fact, perhaps the most popular topic – is sleep.  We all need it, we all want it.  Many of us struggle to get the best sleep we can.  Another Healthy Matters veteran, Dr. Ranji Varghese, will be at the broadcast to meet you, to help us understand sleep, and to answer a few questions.

 

Following the broadcast, we’ll have a bit of Q&A and show you around the place a bit.  We’ll have coffee and munchies (donuts, anyone?).

Let’s fill the place!  The broadcast is free to attend, but we need you to RSVP if you plan on attending.  Click here to RSVP for our special “Decade with Dave” LIVE broadcast.

But that’s not all . . .

Announcing . . . Here 4 Health

Hennepin Healthcare’s Clinic and Specialty Center

After kicking off the summer with “Decade with Dave” we are launching an exciting new health education program for the curious and inquisitive among you.  “Here 4 Health” is a series of three educational sessions on a variety of health topics sort of like a mini Medical School.   Except more fun.  And not nearly as grueling.  Come to learn about health topics from cool experts from Hennepin.

You can attend 1, 2, or all 3 sessions.  They’re all free of charge, but you do need to send your RSVP by clicking here.  All events are at the Hennepin Healthcare Clinic and Specialty Center.

Here’s what we have planned for “Here 4 Health” (subject to change if any of these colleagues chicken out):

Session 1:  Thursday, July 12, 5-7 p.m

How to live to 100 or die trying.  Dr. David Hilden (that’s me) will be updating a popular session I’ve been giving for years.  I’ll take you behind the scenes at a state-of-the-art working clinic with insider tips on staying healthy.

The Ins and Outs of GI Health.  OK, some smart aleck (probably the same guy who decided to make a career of doing colonoscopies) made up the name for this informative session about colon cancer.  Learn from Hennepin gastroenterologist Dr. Jake Matlock  about colon cancer and colonoscopies!  I know Jake.  Great guy.  Ask him to show you a colonoscope.  Then ask him why the heck he thought it would be cool to look at people’s intestines all day.  You’ll also get the special chance to tour a colonoscopy suite – when you’re NOT on the cart getting your own colonoscopy


Session 2:  Saturday, August 11, 9-11 a.m

Dermatology – your skin questions answered.  Hennepin dermatologists Dr. Sara Hylwa and Dr. Jenny Liu will be on hand.  You’ll never get a better chance to tap into a skin doctor’s expertise.  They are smart and they know skin like the back of your hand – literally.  Just don’t ask them if you can skip wearing sunscreen.   (Spoiler alert. . . you can’t .  . these two are so stingy on that point).

 

The Ancient Art and Modern Practices of Integrative Medicine – Acupuncture and Chiropractic.  A certified acupuncturist and chiropractor will show you around the world of integrative medicine.  Maybe you’ll come away just a little less mystified at these ancient practices.  Ask to see an acupuncture needle.   Dr. Richard Printon and acupuncturist Jessica Brown will be on hand!


Session 3:  Saturday, September 15, 9-11 a.m.

You Gotta Have Heart.  Recent Healthy Matters guest and cardiologist Dr. Michelle Carlson will show you around the world of heart health.   You’ll learn from her particular expertise in women’s heart health and the link between heart health and cancer.  You may want to check out the recent post I did with Dr. Carlson here.

 

Best Practices in Breast Health.  Leah Hahn is the supervisor of the mammography program at Hennepin.  See a mammogram machine for yourself.  Men, you too should attend this session.  It will give you a new appreciation for the women in your life.  And men get breast cancer too!  Check out this post I did with Leah Hahn from a few months ago.

 

A Little Help for your Friends.  Hennepin has the best Physical Therapists AND therapy facilities in the region.  Come see a PT gym and look at the amazing possibilities for therapy.  This is state-of-the-art stuff which you can learn from Senior Physical Therapist Beth Stegora.

 

 

Attend all three sessions or pick and choose the ones you want.  They’re all free and all at the Hennepin Healthcare Clinic and Specialty Center in downtown Minneapolis  Probably the most important part of all .  . . the parking is right there underground.  Could not be simpler.

Why should I go learn something?

Here’s why I think you should attend the LIVE Decade with Dave broadcast and why you should attend the Here 4 Health series . . .

You could sit home and watch TV.  Or stare at the grass and watch it grow.  Or sit on your couch and get bad health information from the Internet.

Or you could get out of the house, come to the Here 4 Health series, and learn from fun, smart, and reliable doctors and health professionals.  All while taking in the art-filled and warm setting of a state-of-the-art health facility.  

RSVP here.

Looking forward to meeting lots of you!

David

 

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Women’s heart health: your questions answered

Michelle Carlson, MD & Jill Jordan, PA-C, , MMS, RD

Think men and women are just the same?  No, I didn’t think so.  But when it comes to heart disease, much of what the medical community talks about is focused on men’s heart health.  So on the Healthy Matters radio broadcast last Sunday, we focused on women’s heart health.

I was joined in the WCCO studios by two women whose careers are focused on caring for hearts.  They are Dr. Michelle Carlson, a cardiologist, and Jill Jordan, a Certified Physician Assistant with clinical practice in Cardiology.  Not only are these two really knowledgeable about cardiology in general, they are particularly tuned into the health of women.  Not only that, they do cool work with cancer and heart disease.   And I can personally vouch that they are approachable providers with a good listening ear and wise advice for their patients.

Three things you can do to learn more:

  • Listen to the podcast of the Women’s Heart Health show by clicking the logo here. It is Healthy Mattes Show #482, April 8, 2018

  • Click Dr. Carlson and Jill Jordan’s pictures here for their bio and contact information, or go to the Heart Center at Hennepin Healthcare to learn more and including info on making appointments.
Michelle Carlson, MD
Jill Jordan, MMS, PA-C, RD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Read on for brief and informative answers to listener questions that we did not have time for on the radio broadcast.  Heart attack, jaw pain, ischemia, family history, varicose veins, valves, exercise, diet, yoga.  It’s all here!  The responses are directly from Dr. Carlson and Jill Jordan.  Don’t miss the last question (scroll down!) about heart disease and cancer.   Pictures and links, too!

Continue reading “Women’s heart health: your questions answered”

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The connection between weight and heart disease

We all know that being overweight is probably not good for our health.  It seems to make intuitive sense and there is ample scientific data that says losing weight is good for you in the long run.  But there are many uncertainties.  One of the unanswered questions is how best to measure body fat and how best to correlate being overweight with long-term disease.

This past week there was a big study published out of Europe that tried to address these issues.  In this post I’m going to break it down for you and see if there is anything we can learn from this study.  As always,  it is important to note that this is just one observational study, which means that it simply looks at a large population of people and attempts to observe a specific medical outcome (in this case, heart disease) with a specific condition (in this case being overweight).  It can’t prove cause and effect!

Consider this post a “mini-Medical School” in which I’ll walk you through a medical research study.  It may get a bit nerdy.  Here we go.

Continue reading “The connection between weight and heart disease”

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Quick tips: influenza, angina, kidneys, & blood pressure

Hi, everybody.  I’m back with one of these “Quick tips” posts where I answer questions that were sent to me on a recent Healthy Matters radio broadcast.  Regular listeners will know that I never can get to all of the questions, particularly those sent by text message, so I will try here to do some brief answers.  I’ll keep it to just a few topics, and will do more posts in the near future.

Here are the topics in this post.  Click the links to jump right to a specific topic.

As always, I invite you to listen to the Healthy Matters broadcasts, either live or via podcast.  Here are ways to listen:

  • Live on News Radio 830 WCCO on your AM dial.  Sunday mornings, 7:30 Central Time.  You’d be surprised how far the WCCO signal reaches from our downtown Minneapolis studios.
  • Live on WCCO.COM.  Sunday mornings, 7:30 Central Time, from anywhere on Earth with Internet
  • At your convenience, via podcast.  Simply click on the “Listen to Podcasts” link right here on MyHealthyMatters.org or go directly to WCCO.COM on the “Audio” link and find Healthy Matters.   You can listen directly online or you can download the podcast to your phone, tablet, or computer and listen anytime at your own convenience.  Without commercials!
  • Or just click the logo here:
Podcasts

Continue reading “Quick tips: influenza, angina, kidneys, & blood pressure”

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New blood pressure guidelines: 130 is the new 140

Dr. Marty Stillman reassures me about my blood pressure

For many years I have been telling listeners and patients that “one-third of you have high blood pressure and many of you don’t know it.”  Turns out I need to update that to “nearly one-half of you have high blood pressure and many of you don’t know it.”

That is because the American College of Cardiology / American Heart Association guidelines for hypertension – high blood pressure – were recently updated.  Like any good scientific process, the guidelines change as our knowledge of the science changes.  That is exactly what occurred this past month.

I mentioned all this on the most recent Healthy Matters radio broadcast.  I started the show off with this information, all of which you can listen to on the podcast by clicking Healthy Matters show #463, November 19,2017.

Your doctor may be . . . should be . . .  talking about this with you at some future visit.  In this post I’ll try to break the new guidelines down for you a bit.  If you read on, you’ll find:

  • New 2017 blood pressure guidelines
  • Bad effects of high blood pressure
  • A word about garden hoses and metal pipes.  Huh?
  • How to measure your own blood pressure.
  • Treatments for high blood pressure.
  • Tips about healthy living.

Let’s get to it.

Continue reading “New blood pressure guidelines: 130 is the new 140”

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Surgeon and TV star Dr. DiBardino talks heart valves

Dr. Daniel DiBardino
Dr. Daniel DiBardino

Hello from warm and muggy Minneapolis!  Yup, it’s summer here in the upper Midwest in my hometown.  Hope you’re cool and comfortable where ever you are checking in from.

Today’s topic is loosely about heart surgery and I’ll highlight one of my new surgeon colleagues at HCMC, Dr. Daniel DiBardino.

To get us started I talked a bit about heart valves in the last post which you can check out here.  Since that post I had a fantastic guy on the Healthy Matters radio broadcast:  Dr. Daniel DiBardino is a cardiac surgeon on the staff of Hennepin County Medical Center.  This guy is not only a skilled cardiothoracic surgeon but he’s also a bit of a celebrity.  And as I found, he’s the kind of guy that you warm up to in the first minute that you meet.  That’s Dr. DiBardino in the picture and you can learn more about him here.

My first bit of advice is to listen to the podcast of the Healthy Matters show featuring Dr. “DiBar” – just click my face here:

HM logo newer

I think Daniel is my first radio show guest (in nearly 8 years of broadcasts) that is also a genuine TV star.  You may have heard about the TV series Boston Med which aired on ABC back in 2010.  Boston Med was a real-life documentary series in which camera crews followed the action at a few of the premier hospitals in the United States.  Dr. DiBardino was a surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston at that time and he featured prominently in the very first episode.  Totally cracks me up that his nickname on the show was “Dr. DiBar” – when you meet him it totally fits that he’d have a catchy nickname.  Here is the entire first episode of Boston Med if you want to check it out:

 

 

What do heart valves do?

In my last post, which you can check out here, I talked about the basic physiology of the heart.  I thought about getting into some more detail here in this post, but as I started to write more about the heart and what can go wrong, I quickly realized why it takes a a dozen years or more to become a cardiac surgeon.  This is a huuuge topic so I abandoned that effort.  Rather, I will simply offer a number of links for you to read more as you wish.  As always, I try to provide links only to reliable sources, the Internet being a pretty tough place to separate the wheat from the chaff, so to speak.

Overview of valve disease

First, for a great and readable overview of heart valve disease, click on this page from National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the US Government’s National Institutes of Health – or NIH – which is our country’s major route for funding quality research).

Here’s an echo (ultrasound) picture of the four chambers of the heart – you can even see the valve leaflets of the mitral valve on the right side of this picture (though in reality that is the left side of the heart  . . . medical images are usually looked at backward like this!)

iStock_000063540139_Large

Aortic stenosis

One of the more common valvular diseases is aortic stenosis.  The aortic valve sits between the left ventricle (the big, muscular pumping chamber) and the aorta (the biggest artery in your body and the major conduit for blood to your body).  When the valve gets stenotic (or narrowed), it fails to open all the way. The heart then has to beat harder and harder and harder to get blood out to your body.  This can lead to feelings of dizziness, chest pain, or shortness of breath.  If untreated, it can lead to heart failure.

One in ten people over age 75 will get aortic stenosis.  Yikes!  The treatment is surgery and I’m happy to say surgery really works, as scary as it may sound.  To understand more about aortic stenosis, watch this short video from the Alliance for Aging Research:

 

Aortic insufficiency and mitral insufficiency

Also known as aortic or mitral regurgitation, this is just about the opposite problem of stenosis.  Valvular insufficiency is the situation where the valve fails to close all the way hence it gets leaky.  As we learned elsewhere, a leaky valve means blood goes the wrong way.  For more info, I recommend checking out the information from the American Heart Association here.

Random trivia since I love trivia:  the mitral valve is so named because someone thought the valve looked like a bishop’s mitre (hat).  Never learned that in med school!

Bishop's_mitre,_Bishopsgate,_London

What about the other valves?

Most heart valve problems occur in the aortic and mitral valves which are located in the high-pressure left side of the heart.  There are two other valves on the lower-pressure right side. They are the tricuspid valve (so named for its three leaflets) and the pulmonic valve (which is located between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery leading to the lungs).

These right-sided valves can also have problems and are sometimes implicated in congenital heart disease (which means problems present at birth) but they are far less likely to need replacement as adult.

Valve surgery

As we talked about with Dr. DiBardino on the radio broadcast, valve surgery can involve replacement either with a mechanical valve made from manufactured materials or a bioprosthetic (aka tissue) valve which uses tissue from animals.  Both are perfectly acceptable options.   A good explanation on these two types is in this video.  I invite you to pay particular attention to the explanation of the differences between these 2 types of valves which starts about one minute into the video.

 

Dr. DiBardino

In my job I encounter all sorts of characters, and I’m just talking about the doctors!  This past week was really fun hanging out with Dr. DiBardino, one of the terrific surgeons at my hospital.  If you need a heart surgeon, you ought to know about this guy who practices at Hennepin County Medical Center.  As always, to reach any doctor any HCMC, call 612-873-6963.  Or check out HCMC.ORG.  And learn more about Dr. DiBardino here.

Thanks for subscribing to MyHealthyMatters.org.  What?  You haven’t subscribed by e-mail?  Do it today right below on this page.  Don’t worry I won’t flood your inbox with too many e-mails and I will never get all commercial and try to sell you stuff.

Bye!

David

 

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Quick tips: Heart valves, prolapsed uterus, gout

Hey hey hey!  

Last week was an “Open Lines’ show and thanks to the best listening audience in the world, I had more questions than I had time for answers.  Here’s another edition of Quick Tips from the listener mail bag.DRH Letterbox

If you missed the show, click the Healthy Matters logo below and listen to it on your time, your terms, your device.  I’m all accommodating like that.logo_healthy-matters

 

I’ll cover heart valves, uterus prolapse, and gout – all questions from listeners.  Remember these are quick tips only so not complete answers.  It occurred to me that none of these topics are in area of expertise so I’ll be very general.  As always, my medical thoughts are only for advice and information.  You should see your own doctor for your own personal needs. Continue reading “Quick tips: Heart valves, prolapsed uterus, gout”

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Aspirin: should you take it?

aspirinThere was a big development in health care news this week.  The buzz is all about the latest guidelines on aspirin since our friends at the US Preventive Services Task Force updated the recommendations.  It came out in the Annals of Internal Medicine just this week on April 12, 2016.  Talk about “hot off the presses” reporting, eh?  This post is going to decipher the guidelines on who should take a daily aspirin to prevent heart attacks, stroke, and now even colon cancer.  I think this is one of the most important topics I’ve covered yet.

Consider the humble aspirin

  • Descendant of willow bark
  • Invented during the reign of Queen Victoria
  • Known to doctors and nerdy people (that may be redundant) as acetylsalicylic acid (aka ASA to prescription-writers)
  • Introduced by Bayer in 1899 as a powder to treat rheumatic conditions like gout
  • Has been used for centuries (maybe without knowing why) as a pain reliever
  • Almost certainly reduces risk of heart attacks , strokes, and colon cancer.  Possibly reduces risks of esophageal, breast, ovarian, and maybe some other cancers as well.

Should I take an aspirin?

I should note that I’m going to stick to people who have NOT had a heart attack or stroke.   Those people certainly need some kind of anti-platelet treatment and aspirin is one of the best choices for many reasons and may be helpful for secondary prevention of future problems.  Here we are referring to primary prevention which means trying to prevent heart attack and stroke (and we can add colorectal cancer) in people who have never had these conditions.

So let’s get to it.  What do the new guidelines say? Continue reading “Aspirin: should you take it?”

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