OK what’s a hernia and how do you get rid of it

Anybody know what a hernia is and how to get rid of it?   Well, I’ll tell ya!

Many think of hernia as something old men get.  Reminds me of a TV show that I watched repeatedly years ago.  The show was “Cheers” and it followed the gang from the Boston bar where “everybody knows your name.”  In one episode, Sam Malone (played by Ted Danson) develops a hernia and he’s struggling since he considers it a condition old men get and it called into question his youthful virility.  There must be something with men and aging and our fragile egos.  Or so says my wife.

Technically speaking, and I know how smart and techy all you MyHealthyMatters readers are, a hernia is when an organ or other body tissue gets squeezed through a weak spot in the surrounding tissue or muscle.  This can happen in lots of places in your body, among them (warning the following few sentences may make you go “ewwww”):

  • Intestines poking through a weak part of the abdominal wall (inguinal, umbilical, abdominal hernia).
  • Stomach getting pushed through the diaphragm so part of it lands in the chest instead of the abdomen (hiatal hernia).
  • Even the brain can herniate, which is a fatal condition in which the stem of the brain gets forced out of the base of the skull due to swelling, inflammation, bleeding, or trauma.

I’m going to focus on the first kind of hernia.  I’m doing so because on a recent Healthy Matters broadcast, we had a great discussion about hernias with my two guests, both terrific surgeons at Hennepin Healthcare.

Read on to meet those surgeons, to learn a bit more about hernia, and especially to learn of a great opportunity to attend an event in Minneapolis.  For the aurally inclined, you can listen to our hernia show via the podcast here:

See that 16th century hernia surgery in the picture above?  Thankfully, hernia surgery is much more civilized now.  Read on . . .  Continue reading “OK what’s a hernia and how do you get rid of it”

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Burns 1-2-3

fire_from_brazierHey hey we are going to talk about burn injuries to your skin in this post.  It’s a follow-up to the radio broadcast of last week where I talked with a burn surgeon.  We learned some really important information about what to do when you or a loved one gets burned and we picked up cool lesser known (at least to me) factoids about burns and your skin.

 

Factoid:  Your skin is the largest organ in your body.  OK, maybe you knew that one already.

Read on to learn more about:

  • Most common causes of burn injuries in children and adults, including a short video of some knuckleheaded guys.
  • The classification of burns – that 1st, 2nd, 3rd degree business.
  • First aid for burns.  What to do if you get burned.  And what not to do.
  • An insider look at a modern Burn Unit, complete with a slick video.

Continue reading “Burns 1-2-3”

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Surgeon and TV star Dr. DiBardino talks heart valves

Dr. Daniel DiBardino
Dr. Daniel DiBardino

Hello from warm and muggy Minneapolis!  Yup, it’s summer here in the upper Midwest in my hometown.  Hope you’re cool and comfortable where ever you are checking in from.

Today’s topic is loosely about heart surgery and I’ll highlight one of my new surgeon colleagues at HCMC, Dr. Daniel DiBardino.

To get us started I talked a bit about heart valves in the last post which you can check out here.  Since that post I had a fantastic guy on the Healthy Matters radio broadcast:  Dr. Daniel DiBardino is a cardiac surgeon on the staff of Hennepin County Medical Center.  This guy is not only a skilled cardiothoracic surgeon but he’s also a bit of a celebrity.  And as I found, he’s the kind of guy that you warm up to in the first minute that you meet.  That’s Dr. DiBardino in the picture and you can learn more about him here.

My first bit of advice is to listen to the podcast of the Healthy Matters show featuring Dr. “DiBar” – just click my face here:

HM logo newer

I think Daniel is my first radio show guest (in nearly 8 years of broadcasts) that is also a genuine TV star.  You may have heard about the TV series Boston Med which aired on ABC back in 2010.  Boston Med was a real-life documentary series in which camera crews followed the action at a few of the premier hospitals in the United States.  Dr. DiBardino was a surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston at that time and he featured prominently in the very first episode.  Totally cracks me up that his nickname on the show was “Dr. DiBar” – when you meet him it totally fits that he’d have a catchy nickname.  Here is the entire first episode of Boston Med if you want to check it out:

 

 

What do heart valves do?

In my last post, which you can check out here, I talked about the basic physiology of the heart.  I thought about getting into some more detail here in this post, but as I started to write more about the heart and what can go wrong, I quickly realized why it takes a a dozen years or more to become a cardiac surgeon.  This is a huuuge topic so I abandoned that effort.  Rather, I will simply offer a number of links for you to read more as you wish.  As always, I try to provide links only to reliable sources, the Internet being a pretty tough place to separate the wheat from the chaff, so to speak.

Overview of valve disease

First, for a great and readable overview of heart valve disease, click on this page from National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the US Government’s National Institutes of Health – or NIH – which is our country’s major route for funding quality research).

Here’s an echo (ultrasound) picture of the four chambers of the heart – you can even see the valve leaflets of the mitral valve on the right side of this picture (though in reality that is the left side of the heart  . . . medical images are usually looked at backward like this!)

iStock_000063540139_Large

Aortic stenosis

One of the more common valvular diseases is aortic stenosis.  The aortic valve sits between the left ventricle (the big, muscular pumping chamber) and the aorta (the biggest artery in your body and the major conduit for blood to your body).  When the valve gets stenotic (or narrowed), it fails to open all the way. The heart then has to beat harder and harder and harder to get blood out to your body.  This can lead to feelings of dizziness, chest pain, or shortness of breath.  If untreated, it can lead to heart failure.

One in ten people over age 75 will get aortic stenosis.  Yikes!  The treatment is surgery and I’m happy to say surgery really works, as scary as it may sound.  To understand more about aortic stenosis, watch this short video from the Alliance for Aging Research:

 

Aortic insufficiency and mitral insufficiency

Also known as aortic or mitral regurgitation, this is just about the opposite problem of stenosis.  Valvular insufficiency is the situation where the valve fails to close all the way hence it gets leaky.  As we learned elsewhere, a leaky valve means blood goes the wrong way.  For more info, I recommend checking out the information from the American Heart Association here.

Random trivia since I love trivia:  the mitral valve is so named because someone thought the valve looked like a bishop’s mitre (hat).  Never learned that in med school!

Bishop's_mitre,_Bishopsgate,_London

What about the other valves?

Most heart valve problems occur in the aortic and mitral valves which are located in the high-pressure left side of the heart.  There are two other valves on the lower-pressure right side. They are the tricuspid valve (so named for its three leaflets) and the pulmonic valve (which is located between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery leading to the lungs).

These right-sided valves can also have problems and are sometimes implicated in congenital heart disease (which means problems present at birth) but they are far less likely to need replacement as adult.

Valve surgery

As we talked about with Dr. DiBardino on the radio broadcast, valve surgery can involve replacement either with a mechanical valve made from manufactured materials or a bioprosthetic (aka tissue) valve which uses tissue from animals.  Both are perfectly acceptable options.   A good explanation on these two types is in this video.  I invite you to pay particular attention to the explanation of the differences between these 2 types of valves which starts about one minute into the video.

 

Dr. DiBardino

In my job I encounter all sorts of characters, and I’m just talking about the doctors!  This past week was really fun hanging out with Dr. DiBardino, one of the terrific surgeons at my hospital.  If you need a heart surgeon, you ought to know about this guy who practices at Hennepin County Medical Center.  As always, to reach any doctor any HCMC, call 612-873-6963.  Or check out HCMC.ORG.  And learn more about Dr. DiBardino here.

Thanks for subscribing to MyHealthyMatters.org.  What?  You haven’t subscribed by e-mail?  Do it today right below on this page.  Don’t worry I won’t flood your inbox with too many e-mails and I will never get all commercial and try to sell you stuff.

Bye!

David

 

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Got a tooth question? We have answers!

toothHey, friends, I’m back.  This time with a slew of questions from all of YOU about your teeth.  Last Sunday on the radio broadcast we talked about dental topics  – something I don’t do very often.  I don’t talk about the teeth much because basically in medical school we learn exactly NOTHING about teeth.  Happily, HCMC (the health care system that employs me) has a terrific group of dentists and oral surgeons.

On the show, we intended to talk about dental implants and other oral surgeries. Eventually, we did do this.  But I, of course, had other insightful and probing questions for my guest (oral surgeon Louis Christensen) – questions like:

  • “Why are they called ‘wisdom teeth’?”
  • And maybe more to the point, “Did I get dumber when I had my wisdom teeth yanked out?”

I think the correct answer to the first questions is “nobody knows” and the answer to the second question is “Yes.

Dental implants are really cool if you are a hockey player.  Or even if not a hockey player.

Christensen studioFortunately, listeners to the show had questions that were much more en pointe, as they say.  We learned cool stuff from Dr. Louis Christensen (that’s him in the picture) who joined me early on a Sunday morning in the WCCO studios in downtown Minneapolis.  He’s an oral surgeon who does surgeries not only on wisdom teeth, but he does dental implants, jaw reconstruction, face reconstruction (oh my!) and lots of other work to keep our teeth and faces in top shape.

As is often the case, though, we didn’t get to cover all the questions people had, so in this post we’ll try to answer some.  If you missed the show, you may want to check out the podcast here. Continue reading “Got a tooth question? We have answers!”

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Concerned about allergies? Maybe you should feed your baby some peanut butter

peanuts butterOK, first off that is a delish-looking bowl of peanut butter in this picture.  And I love peanut butter.  Especially on a banana.  Anybody else put peanut butter on bananas?  Or apples?  I put it on both!

Seriously that is some quality peanut butter. But who really makes homemade peanut butter from scratch?  Ha!

But I digress before I’ve even introduced the topic of this post . . .

There is new information about peanut allergies that I think is important to know – especially for parents of young kids.  So this is a post about reducing risk of developing peanut allergies in kids.   Continue reading “Concerned about allergies? Maybe you should feed your baby some peanut butter”

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Healing wounds, preserving limbs

Drs. Tom Master and Nikki Bauerly visit the WCCO studio for live Healthy Matters broadcast
Drs. Tom Masters and Nikki Bauerly visit the WCCO studio for live Healthy Matters broadcast

This post is all about wound healing, hyperbaric oxygen, and fluorescent microangiography.   Now if that doesn’t get your attention . . .

Here’s a preview of what you will find in this post – lots of multimedia clips and info:

  • Basics about leg wounds
  • A video about hyperbaric oxygen
  • A news report from TV highlighting a recent patient undergoing LUNA angiography
  • Links to more information

Read on! Continue reading “Healing wounds, preserving limbs”

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