Alicia’s incredible story. Read this post, save a life.

Alicia Bravo, BAN RN CEN TCRN CPEN
Brad Bart, MD

Be brave.  That is Alicia’s message.

This is undoubtedly the most powerful story we’ve yet told in 10 years of Healthy Matters broadcasts.

If you missed last week’s show, you missed a doozy of a personal story.  Alicia Bravo is a nurse at Hennepin’s Emergency Department and just one year ago this healthy triathlete experienced a sudden cardiac arrest while swimming.  Her dad and husband saved her life with CPR and now she is spreading the word about it.  You’re going to want to listen to her tell the story on the podcast by clicking Listen to Podcasts at the right of this page.

To give us additional expertise, we were joined in the studio by Dr. Brad Bart, Director of Cardiology at Hennepin Healthcare.    As a follow-up to the show, I asked each of them to respond to some written questions.   What follows is from Alicia and Dr. Bart.  There are powerful and wise words in this post, some links to helpful sites, a way you can donate to CPR education, and even an event that involves drinking beer.

I encourage you to read it through.  You may save a life someday.

Please share this post on Facebook, Instagram, and with your friends by clicking the icons above.  This is a message we need to get out!  

Continue reading “Alicia’s incredible story. Read this post, save a life.”

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An insider’s view of the Emergency Department

I have a colleague at Hennepin County Medical Center who is into cool stuff.  He does a lot of biking, he does backcountry skiing in British Columbia, he raises bees in his Minneapolis backyard and makes honey from those bees – honey which has won awards at the Minnesota State Fair, no less.

And he tells a good tale.  His name is Aaron Rutzick.  One time he told me this one about a bike crash he had when in real-time he realized that his helmet was saving him as he hit the pavement with his head . . .

“I was riding down 3rd Ave in south Minneapolis at night, I think I hit a pothole or something in the road because I was going pretty fast and just went over my handle bars.  there I was, upside down, and yes … using my helmet.  I slid to a stop in front of some hipster bikers drinking beer.  They were sympathetic and seemed to have a keen understanding of that moment.  I was OK and took off for home before everything started hurting.  I’d say in general, I’m a pretty experienced commuter, riding most days in all seasons to get to work since 2001.  Thankfully, no car was involved, but it was a reminder that a bike crash could happen in a split second – so BE CAREFUL.  It didn’t keep me from riding, I’m certainly aware that you have to be on your game, especially with cars.  The Twin Cities has really developed its bicycle lanes over the last 10-15 years, and is one of the leading cities in the nation for supporting safe biking and bike culture.  Great place to live for this.”   – Dr. Aaron Rutzick

I especially like the image of Aaron flying over his handlebars in front of “hipster bikers drinking beer.”  Sort of sums up Minneapolis life.  I wonder if any of the hipsters looked like this:

By Lorena Cupcake [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Anyway, you should wear your bike helmet like Dr. Rutzick so you can live to tell about it. Continue reading “An insider’s view of the Emergency Department”

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